Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

The Middle East region is undergoing its most difficult time in this century. Iraq’s invasion has indeed caused widespread repercussions. The failure of efforts between Turkey and Iran to come to terms with one another in leading the developments in the region on a peaceful co-existence of different sects resulted in an increased polarization of the region. Turkey’s growing involvement in Syria together with the US and some Western partners, helped to generate a counter-bloc comprised of Iran, Russia, and China. When considered with their supporters in Iraq and Syria this is indeed a strong bloc. One may say there is a new cold war in the making in the Middle East. Much has been said, written, and speculated about the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), but it is clear that it will take a huge effort to uproot it from the lands it has occupied. It is a common perception in the international community that the AKP government assisted al-Nusra and ISIL and that Gulf funding was used in this process. This has caused considerable consternation not only in Syria but also in Iraq, and certainly in Iran and Russia. In this article, the author argues that Turkish foreign policy in the region has been on a downward slide since the AKP government gradually dispensed with secular principles. Today, the credibility of Turkish foreign policy has hit rock bottom in the region.

 

CONTRIBUTOR
Murat Özçelik
Murat Özçelik
From the Desk of the Editor Over the last couple of years, Turkey has weathered multiples storms in close succession: two general elections that took place in a polarized political climate, an escalation of the Turkey-PKK conflict, a crisis with Russia, the 2016 failed coup attempt followed by state of emergency measures, and the continued threat of terrorist attacks. The aftermath of the constitutional referendum in April...
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