Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

China has experienced remarkable economic growth since the transformation of its economy in the late 1980s, but its wage growth is comparatively slower. China’s income inequality has simultaneously intensified, which can be observed on many dimensions. Such uneven distribution between urban and rural residents and among individuals in general has a negative impact on consumer demand, which influences China’s trade patterns and economic growth. This article argues that China’s economic growth could be sustained along with growing consumer demand through a narrowing of its income gap and the establishment of a social security network.

 

CONTRIBUTOR
Heng Quan
Heng Quan

Heng Quan is a Professor of Economics and a Senior Research Fellow at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences in China.

Hairong Luo
Hairong Luo

Hairong Luo is a PhD candidate at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences.

This issue was published in collaboration with the Friedrich Naumann Foundation Turkey Office.
From the Desk of the Editor TPQ’s Fall 2019 issue, published in collaboration with the Friedrich Naumann Foundation, titled Populism and the Age of Upheaval, examines the rise of populism and its impact on the international order – from governance issues to the environment to gender ideology. Since 2016, the world has been monitoring and trying to forecast the turnout of a series of events that started with...
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