Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

China has experienced remarkable economic growth since the transformation of its economy in the late 1980s, but its wage growth is comparatively slower. China’s income inequality has simultaneously intensified, which can be observed on many dimensions. Such uneven distribution between urban and rural residents and among individuals in general has a negative impact on consumer demand, which influences China’s trade patterns and economic growth. This article argues that China’s economic growth could be sustained along with growing consumer demand through a narrowing of its income gap and the establishment of a social security network.

 

CONTRIBUTOR
Heng Quan & Hairong Luo
Heng Quan & Hairong Luo Heng Quan is a Professor of Economics and a Senior Research Fellow at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences in China. Hairong Luo is a PhD candidate at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences.
From the Desk of the Editor This issue of TPQ takes up a myriad of issues that the Middle East is grappling with today: from protracted conflicts and the increasing complexity of proxy wars, to changing regional blocs and emerging powers. The Arab uprisings of 2011 remain an important fulcrum for the changing political landscape of the Middle East, and as many of our authors contend, the underlying problems and basic drivers...
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