Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

Afghanistan’s political methods and skills are born out of a perception that almost everyone possesses very limited opportunities and resources, and that perception produces a political culture that one must do whatever it takes to survive. That culture of “amoral familism” ironically offers almost unlimited opportunities for individuals to make a deal about almost anything. So, the question remains: Will the Afghan leaders be able to use their traditional skills to manage the culture of unrestrained deal-making? Can they can piece together one factional linkage after another, and create an ever growing political stability and economic growth?


 

 
CONTRIBUTOR
Bob Spencer & Armando Geller
Bob Spencer & Armando Geller
From the Desk of the Editor This issue of TPQ takes up a myriad of issues that the Middle East is grappling with today: from protracted conflicts and the increasing complexity of proxy wars, to changing regional blocs and emerging powers. The Arab uprisings of 2011 remain an important fulcrum for the changing political landscape of the Middle East, and as many of our authors contend, the underlying problems and basic drivers...
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