Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

The Euro-Atlantic: Fit For Global Action?, Fall 2006

The Euro-Atlantic: Fit For Global Action?, Fall 2006

  Since the end of the Cold War, and more acutely, in the aftermath of the events of September 11, 2001, transatlantic relations have become unfocused and strained. Although U.S.-European relations have begun to mend in the last year, challenges remain in developing a common agenda and suitable mechanisms to overcome global problems. With this issue of TPQ the authors explore transatlantic relations today and weave Turkey and its neighborhood into the picture when analyzing the path...

Nigâr Göksel | 05 December 2006

Do Bridges Unite?, Fall 2006

Do Bridges Unite?, Fall 2006

The author, as the foreign minister of a new EU and NATO member state, outlines his country’s vision for the transatlantic partnership. As argued in this article, both pillars of the Euro-Atlantic community are indispensable under current circumstances. Latvia’s membership in the EU and NATO strengthens transatlantic ties; if these ties are weakened, Latvia’s security is also likely to be weakened. Following the accession to the EU and NATO of Latvia and the other new members, a greater...

Artis Pabriks | 05 December 2006

The Importance of Transatlantic Unity for Turkish Foreign Policy, Fall 2006

The Importance of Transatlantic Unity for Turkish Foreign Policy, Fall 2006

As part of the transatlantic community Turkey is influenced by every aspect of the transatlantic relations. Turkey puts priority on the vitality of cooperation among the transatlantic partners and their institutions. It contributes significant regional insight, connections, and capabilities to the transatlantic community and the EU. Turkey finds itself at the center of a vast geography stretching from Europe to Central Asia, and the broader Middle East. Turkey and the U.S. have been investing...

Nabi Şensoy | 05 December 2006

Time to Revitalize the NATO Alliance and Deal with ESDP, Fall 2006

Time to Revitalize the NATO Alliance and Deal with ESDP, Fall 2006

European Security and Defense Policy (ESDP) adds nothing to military capabilities. It should be seen for what it is - part of the process of European political integration, intruding into the most sensitive areas of national sovereignty, undermining NATO and widening the gap between the U.S. and Europe. But fresh thought needs to be given to NATO itself which seems to have lost its way...Please click here to read the text in full.

Geoffrey Van Orden | 05 December 2006

Reflections on NATO's Political and Military Transformation since 9/11, Fall 2006

Reflections on NATO's Political and Military Transformation since 9/11, Fall 2006

The challenge for NATO is not to demonstrate its relevance by launching ever more distant and ambitious new missions but to overhaul its own institution so that it can better exploit the three key power levers: Military expeditionary force; civil-military coordination; and strategic political direction. Otherwise the more NATO tries to go global, the more it risks to under-perform and bite off more than it can chew.   Please click here to read the text in full.

Jamie Shea | 05 December 2006

Directionless Turkey: Quo Vadis, Fall 2006

Directionless Turkey: Quo Vadis, Fall 2006

Various opinion surveys this year have illustrated a visible swing from the West and, sometimes, towards the East. Empirical evidence supports the findings of these surveys. The apparent confusion in the Turkish thinking is the result of a combination of historical, recent and present-day factors. But a popular slide from the West should not necessarily mean a popular (or governmental) slide towards the East. There are deep-rooted historical, religious, ethnic and practical reasons why Turkey...

Burak Bekdil | 05 December 2006

Erosion of an Alliance, Fall 2006

Erosion of an Alliance, Fall 2006

Since the ascension of the Justice and Development Party (AKP) to power, officials of the Turkish government are using Islam and “our Muslim brothers in the Middle East” as reference points for governing and for conducting foreign policy. With AKP’s continuous harsh criticism of the U.S. and the West in general, one finds a Turkish public opinion that is increasingly anti-American and increasingly identifies with Islamic causes. Washington is now concerned not only because of...

Yola Habif | 05 December 2006

Wishful Thinking: Strategic Imperatives and their Limits in Turkey's EU Aspirations, Fall 2006

Wishful Thinking: Strategic Imperatives and their Limits in Turkey's EU Aspirations, Fall 2006

In an effort to counter concerns that Turkey is too big, too poor, and too Muslim to join the European Union, Turkish officials routinely stress the strategic benefits Turkish membership would provide the EU. While this argument may resonate in Washington and certain corners of Brussels, it is having little impact on the wider European public. By analyzing Turkey’s strategic rationale, the debate within the EU about its geographic and cultural limits, and the growing importance of...

Joseph N. Yackley | 05 December 2006

The Vatican and Turkey on the Eve of Pope Benedict's Visit, Fall 2006

The Vatican and Turkey on the Eve of Pope Benedict's Visit, Fall 2006

The visit of Pope Benedict XVI takes place under conditions of great tension which did not obtain when his predecessor, John Paul I, visited Turkey nearly thirty years ago. This is largely because of unresolved disputes in the 1990 between the Vatican and Turkey over issues of legal recognition of Catholic churches in Turkey and their ownership. The article recommends modernization of the style of Vatican external representation and new Turkish legislation guaranteeing that foreign churches can...

David Barchard | 05 December 2006

Turkish-Kurdish Reconciliation: Promise and Peril, Fall 2006

Turkish-Kurdish Reconciliation: Promise and Peril, Fall 2006

As part of its ongoing negotiations with the European Union, Turkey has made an effort to broaden its definition of national identity to include ethnic and religious sub-groups. This reconciliation process – a welcomed step for Turkey - is held at risk by the inherent instability of the reform process itself and the unpropitious regional and global environment. To continue the path to membership in the EU, interested parties such as the United States will have to play a crucial role in...

Matan Chorev and Geoffrey Gresh | 05 December 2006

Managing the Middle East: The Need to Revive Transatlantic Cooperation, Fall 2006

Managing the Middle East: The Need to Revive Transatlantic Cooperation, Fall 2006

Following the devastating terrorist attacks of September 11, the international community rallied around Americans, shared their grief, and expressed their solidarity to provide all they could for the United States to track down and punish the responsible. How did the U.S. waste this front of good will and loose credibility among its allies? How did the Bush administration’s strategies fail in the Middle East, undermining U.S. security and prestige?  Arguing that transatlantic...

Selin Esinli Nasi | 05 December 2006

Sustainable Democratization and the Roles of the U.S. and the EU: Political Islam and Kurdish Nation, Fall 2006

Sustainable Democratization and the Roles of the U.S. and the EU: Political Islam and Kurdish Nation, Fall 2006

Sustainable democratization has to be foremost a domestic transformation based on domestic consensus. In regard to political Islam and Kurdish nationalism, which involve complex questions of identity, democratization in Turkey requires time and domestic debate. The EU and the U.S. have significant long-term interests in assisting this process by acting as firm but judicious anchors: They should avoid promoting culturally or historically essentialist values and be non-intrusive in areas with...

Murat Somer | 05 December 2006

The Post 9/11 Divergence of Europe and the United States, Fall 2006

The Post 9/11 Divergence of Europe and the United States, Fall 2006

In the aftermath of 9/11, the issue of international security gained worldwide significance and the reasons behind it have been widely interrogated. The way Turkey and EU countries positioned themselves was very dependant on their relations with the United States, public opinion in their countries and the particular governments ruling them. This paper attempts to analyze transatlantic relations after September 11, tracing the policies each followed in the run up to and following the Iraq war. ...

Aylin Alpagut | 05 December 2006

The 9-11 War Plus 5: Looking Back and Looking Forward at U.S.-Muslim World Relations, Fall 2006

The 9-11 War Plus 5: Looking Back and Looking Forward at U.S.-Muslim World Relations, Fall 2006

Analyzing the current crisis between the U.S. and the Islamic World, the author observes that the U.S. has become isolated by its policies to the detriment of both sides of a building chasm. To win the war of ideas, the author presents an American strategy that recognizes the long-term, generational challenges that must be faced, with concrete suggestions shaped according to the nuances of the Muslim world. Please click here to read the text in full.

Peter Warren Singer | 05 December 2006

STAY CONNECTED
SIGN UP FOR NEWSLETTER
TWEETS
FACEBOOK
FROM THE DESK OF THE EDITOR
From The Desk Of The Editor This issue of TPQ comes at a time when global instability is arguably at its highest point since the end of World War II. The Western-led liberal world order that emerged in its wake, anchored by NATO and bolstered by multilateral institutions such as the European Union and the World Bank is fraying, and the principles upon which the order was founded are being undermined. Furthermore, the...
PARTNERS