Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

Since the mass participation in the Gezi Park protests of 2013, youth activism in Turkey has not translated into party politics, nor has another similar wave of protests followed. However, the line of criticism directed against the government and its leaders during the protests is still present, and is particularly visible online. Besides more serious political criticism found online, certain satire websites, Facebook groups, and some so-called benign Twitter trolls have developed a critical, humorous voice of their own. This article is an analysis of the humor and youth activism displayed in these venues, placing both into the broader context of present-day Turkish politics.

CONTRIBUTOR
Ahu Yiğit
Ahu Yiğit Ahu Yiğit a specialist in Turkish politics. She holds a PhD in political science from Bilkent University in Ankara, and is currently based in Washington DC.
From the Desk of the Editor TPQ’s Summer 2018 issue marks the 11th annual edition that we are publishing with the support of NATO’s Public Diplomacy Division. This long-standing partnership has helped TPQ in its efforts to feature nuanced and diverse opinions on the security policy challenges facing Turkey, the region, and the transatlantic community. Over the years, we have had the privilege of bringing the...
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