Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has frequently compared himself with Adnan Menderes, most recently after his August 10th presidential victory. This article examines the validity of this comparison, its popularity among academic historians, and its role in facilitating Erdoğan’s success. It considers how the coup that toppled Menderes in 1960 helps explain both Erdoğan’s authoritarianism and his popularity. The author characterizes Turkish politics from 1960 to the present as a series of parentheses; the latest one being the era of civilian authoritarianism that the AKP government has ushered in, thereby ending the era of military tutelage that took shape after the 1980 coup.

CONTRIBUTOR
Nicholas Danforth
Nicholas Danforth Nicholas Danforth is a PhD candidate in History at Georgetown University, US.
From the Desk of the Editor This issue of TPQ comes at a time when relations between Turkey and the EU are at a historical low point. The sources of tension are manifold, and have been compounded by a constellation of transformations in Turkey, Europe, and the international system. The global upswing in far-right populist movements, isolationism, the conflict in Syria and its humanitarian crisis, and the threat of ISIS have...
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