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Freedom of religion has been a delicate issue since the founding of the Turkish Republic despite the principle of secularism stated in its constitution. After decades marked by assaults towards non-Muslims in Turkey and confiscation of their properties, several reform packages were adopted by the Turkish government in order better to secure their religious freedoms. This essay focuses on the motives behind and the limitations of the transformation of religious freedoms in Turkey over the last decade. The author argues that the incumbent AKP party’s religious friendly approach, while flexible, is ultimately grounded in Islamic superiority, and therefore remains limiting.

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Anna Maria Beylunioğlu
Anna Maria BeylunioğluAnna Maria Beylunioğlu is a PhD candidate at the Department of Social and Political Sciences of the European University Institute, Florence, Italy.
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Foreword TPQ’s Summer issue, NATO in 2020 and Beyond: New Strategies and Frontiers, offers insights on the Alliance’s current challenges and future security trends, while offering a look into Euro-Atlantic relations in the coming decade. It is clear that as the international security landscape is rapidly changing, member states’ capabilities, resilience, and most importantly, their...
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