Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

Effectively tackling climate change requires strong, wide-spread agreement and high-level policy measures on a global scale. In contrast to the former high carbon economy paradigm, the new era is defined by the de-carbonization of economic activities. In this context, however, Turkey still functions within the old paradigm. Although Turkey is now experiencing extreme climate events more than ever, it has continued to promote carbon-intense growth policies. Compounding the detrimental effects of these national policies, Turkey is also not a visible player in international climate negations. Turkey’s contribution to the new international agreement scheduled to be adopted in Paris in 2015 is critical.

 

CONTRIBUTOR
Önder Algedik
Önder Algedik Önder Algedik is an Ankara-based climate and energy consultant for international organizations, business and NGOs, and the founder of Civil Society Climate Summit.
From the Desk of the Editor Since the founding of the Turkish Republic, competing conceptions of Turkish identity have existed. Among many examples, the role of Islam has been contested, Kurdish and Turkish nationalisms have clashed, and various identity-based movements have ebbed and flowed, shaping political cleavages. National identity contestation has also spilled over into Turkey’s relationship with its Western...
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