Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

As the entire South Caucasus has been immersed in ethnically-framed conflicts since the late 1980s, an ethos of conflict has been constructed in the region. The commonly held views of the Armenian-Azerbaijani, Georgian-South Ossetian, Georgian-Abkhaz, but also Armenian-Turkish and Georgian-Russian conflicts as ancient, natural, intractable, and all-encompassing have been largely shaped by professional historians. Considering that the dynamics that sustain these ongoing conflicts are a serious impediment to democratization and socio-economic progress, we can conclude that the current state of history education whose narratives service conflicts is one of these impediments. This article’s authors therefore argue that comprehensive reform of the structure and content of history education is a necessary condition for progress and development in the South Caucasus.

 

CONTRIBUTOR
Philip Gamaghelyan & Sergey Rumyansev
Philip Gamaghelyan & Sergey Rumyansev
From the Desk of the Editor Over the last couple of years, Turkey has weathered multiples storms in close succession: two general elections that took place in a polarized political climate, an escalation of the Turkey-PKK conflict, a crisis with Russia, the 2016 failed coup attempt followed by state of emergency measures, and the continued threat of terrorist attacks. The aftermath of the constitutional referendum in April...
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