Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

As the Cold War’s domination of the geopolitics of the Middle East recedes, a new architecture is emerging, reminiscent of that of Europe in the 19th century. It is an architecture of mid-sized powers engaging in ever shifting alliances and covert and overt struggles to expand and protect their spheres of influence. Like in 19th century Europe, there is a strong connection between countries vying for influence and the cohesiveness of their national, ethnic, sectarian, and religious identities. Even though, in its immediate aftermath, the European “Spring of Nations” was a complete failure, ultimately the ideas that captured the imagination of a rising young population during the brief moment of the “Spring of Nations” triumphed. The ideals represented in the “Arab Spring” could also become a reality following long and painful convulsions of transformation.

 

CONTRIBUTOR
Einat Wilf
Einat Wilf
From the Desk of the Editor Since the founding of the Turkish Republic, competing conceptions of Turkish identity have existed. Among many examples, the role of Islam has been contested, Kurdish and Turkish nationalisms have clashed, and various identity-based movements have ebbed and flowed, shaping political cleavages. National identity contestation has also spilled over into Turkey’s relationship with its Western...
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