Independent and cutting-edge analysis on global affairs

Since the ratification of the Treaty of Lisbon in 2009, the European Union (EU) has tried to make its voice heard more clearly on the international stage by creating the European External Action Service and strengthening the role of the High Representative for Foreign Affairs. However, these and other tools do not seem to increase the EU's weight in conflict resolution in its wider neighborhood. In the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, the EU's efforts are hampered by competing interests of third actors, by the inadequacy of the tools at its disposal and not least the ambitions of its own member states.

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David Janssen
David Janssen
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Foreword TPQ’s Summer issue, NATO in 2020 and Beyond: New Strategies and Frontiers, offers insights on the Alliance’s current challenges and future security trends, while offering a look into Euro-Atlantic relations in the coming decade. It is clear that as the international security landscape is rapidly changing, member states’ capabilities, resilience, and most importantly, their...
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