Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

The Black Sea Region is between two competing spatial orders, that of the EU/ Europe and that of Russia/CIS. A “counter-coalition to Russia” is being formed in this region. It is an academic truism to speculate about “fuzzy borders” of the EU; yet the contours and shapes of Russian spatial order are also not that simple. The ambiguity stems from numerous nationalist voices in Russia questioning the belonging of Crimea to Ukraine, as well as from the existence of sizeable communities of Russian citizens in Transnistria, Abkhazia and Southern Ossetia. The closer EU and Russia get to each other geographically, the more conflictual the relations between them tend to become. If the coalition against Russia is successful, it might lift Ukraine to the status of regional power and, conversely, drag Russia down from the level of great power to that of regional power. Under this scenario, the idea of a Moscow-led “second, non-Western Europe” (to include Russia itself along with Ukraine, Moldova, Belarus, and even some Balkan countries) advocated by some Russian intellectuals, will definitely fail.

 

CONTRIBUTOR
Andrey S. Makarychev
Andrey S. Makarychev
From the Desk of the Editor Over the last couple of years, Turkey has weathered multiples storms in close succession: two general elections that took place in a polarized political climate, an escalation of the Turkey-PKK conflict, a crisis with Russia, the 2016 failed coup attempt followed by state of emergency measures, and the continued threat of terrorist attacks. The aftermath of the constitutional referendum in April...
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