Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

This article examines the ever-closer relationship between Turkey and Iran. Since the Justice and Development Party (AKP) came to power in Turkey in 2002 it has pursued a markedly more assertive foreign policy than its predecessors. In the case of Iran, despite stark ideological differences, the two countries have recently worked together on a variety of fronts. Today, cooperation comes mainly in the form of energy arrangements, where Turkey looks to Iran’s abundant oil and gas resources to supply its growing energy needs. The situation in Iraq also provides a point of convergence with both countries combating Kurdish separatist groups based in Northern Iraq. However, as Iran’s relations with the West become increasingly hostile over its nuclear program and its support of terrorist groups in the region, Turkey finds itself in a difficult position. Ankara prefers to follow a pragmatic policy and stress the positive aspects of its relationship with Iran, but does not want this to come at the expense of its Western orientation.

 

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CONTRIBUTOR
Daphne Mccurdy
Daphne Mccurdy
From the Desk of the Editor Since the founding of the Turkish Republic, competing conceptions of Turkish identity have existed. Among many examples, the role of Islam has been contested, Kurdish and Turkish nationalisms have clashed, and various identity-based movements have ebbed and flowed, shaping political cleavages. National identity contestation has also spilled over into Turkey’s relationship with its Western...
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