Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

The underrepresentation of women in political decision-making has been a majorproblem for Turkey since the 1960s. Ranking 167th among 189 countries with 4.36percent women in the Turkish national parliament, it is obvious that Turkey hasto ensure women’s “fast-track” access by legislating affi rmative action (quotas).Although still perceived as controversial by some, quotas have proved to be theonly successful way to ensure women’s rapid access to political power and arequite common. A legislative quota is necessary for women to overcome the socialand economical obstacles that prevent them from entering politics in Turkey, andfor the country’s politics to profi t from the rich and unused experience and skillsof women.

 

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CONTRIBUTOR
Selen Lermioğlu Yılmaz
Selen Lermioğlu Yılmaz
From the Desk of the Editor Over the last couple of years, Turkey has weathered multiples storms in close succession: two general elections that took place in a polarized political climate, an escalation of the Turkey-PKK conflict, a crisis with Russia, the 2016 failed coup attempt followed by state of emergency measures, and the continued threat of terrorist attacks. The aftermath of the constitutional referendum in April...
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