Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

The demise of the USSR in 1991 created a power vacuum in the Soviet space that lingers to this day. This development acted as a catalyst in igniting the conflicts in and around the region. Security concerns of the independent states have steadily increased over the past decade and a half and a search for alternative centers for cooperation and security has come about. Russia’s incapacity to offer a sound and reliable cooperation and security system coupled with an increased interest of European and Euro-Atlantic forces in the region has opened the way for a higher level of integration of these states with the West. The result of the tug of war between Russia and the West over the region remains open.

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CONTRIBUTOR
Stepan Gregoryan
Stepan Gregoryan
From the Desk of the Editor This issue of TPQ comes at a time when relations between Turkey and the EU are at a historical low point. The sources of tension are manifold, and have been compounded by a constellation of transformations in Turkey, Europe, and the international system. The global upswing in far-right populist movements, isolationism, the conflict in Syria and its humanitarian crisis, and the threat of ISIS have...
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