Independent and cutting-edge analysis on Turkey and its neighborhood

This article explores topics related to Turkey's demography and immigration to the European Union, as well as the competitive pressure Turkey might add to the EU upon its prospective membership.. The article goes on to ask what Turkey's role is in its neighborhood and particularly, what a youthful population means in this context.Turkey is a youthful nation. The total fertility rate (average number of children per woman) stands at 2.5, down from 3.5 in the 1970s and is expected to decline further as economic prosperity increases1. This downward trend is accompanied by Turkey's population growth rate which has fallen to 1.4 percent per year according to the latest United Nations figures. As of 2003, the country had 71 million inhabitants, and is projected to have 98 million by 2050. In 2015 Turkey will match the population of Germany and continue growing...Please click here to read the text in full.

 

CONTRIBUTOR
Ari Vatanen
Ari Vatanen
From the Desk of the Editor This issue of TPQ comes at a time when relations between Turkey and the EU are at a historical low point. The sources of tension are manifold, and have been compounded by a constellation of transformations in Turkey, Europe, and the international system. The global upswing in far-right populist movements, isolationism, the conflict in Syria and its humanitarian crisis, and the threat of ISIS have...
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